I am not very fond of meetings. Especially not meetings where time seems to falter and stop, or slowly, slowly circle the drain of eternity.

When I was younger and bored in class as a student (well, I was a student until about age 30, so unfortunately not that long ago), I drew. I did not bother to hide it.  I may even have surrounded myself with a small cloud of ostentatiousness while doing it.

Edit: The Birdmonster of 2011, one of my very first blog posts, is a typical example of this./edit

I try to be a little more professional nowadays, but sometimes I slip up and something, or someone, slips out of my pen. This one even had demands. Say hi!


Made in with black Staedler fiber tipped technical pens in 0.1 mm on regular horrid office paper. Note also that I definitely have a regular  writing style a long, sad way from copperplate. Not that lizards generally would speak in copperplate. Or maybe they would?




Computer trouble


Well. Look, it’s November!

My laptop just broke so I’ll cruise along with the ‘net at work and my first ever smartphone I just got delivered. Naturally, “just when I was going to get started with blogging regularly again”, as if anyone still following this blog would believe that.

This means that I will not be updating (at least not with any quality pictures) until March 2016, when my budget will allow a new laptop (no money trouble, just strict budgeting). Lots of scanned images are lost, unfortunately. I did have everything safely backed up, except pictures.

I do plan on making a post or three from my iPad, if I manage to get the new smartphone to work as a router (ugh). I know it is not difficult, but the day job and life in general have been keeping me insanely busy and tired this year (still loving the work, though).

I do have some blogging plans. I have made an order from Goulet pens and one from Cultpens.co.uk with many exciting pens to review (Namiki Falcon, among others). I have finally gotten orchid seed to germinate asymbiotically on agar gel nutritious media in my small home laboratory (an aquarium, a spray bottle of hydrogen peroxide solution, gloves, canning jars and lots of clear garbagebags). I recently started sowing and growing (in a more standard, low-tech way) tropical hibiscus hybrids. In October I participated in a LARP based on Gaimans American Gods. I bought and borrowed some fantastic books (currently reading China Miévilles Three Moments of an Explosion). I played boardgames and music. I even did some drawing, mostly calligraphy stuff. In a professional capacity I have had to learn a lot about image processing, so I hope I will get the opportunity to apply this knowledge to illustrations and drawing in 2016.

In May I visited Faroe Islands with a friend and a smaller friend (pictured). I had a lovely time and I will definitely return in the future.





Oh, what of it.

I’m back after eight months of silence. Real Life got in the way. Now I’m back! New year and sort of an updated online presence. I have aquired an Instagram account (anachroneironaut, for some reason Anachroneironaut wasn’t available).

I’m not going to be able to recap the lion part of 2014 to my satisfaction, so I’ll just pick up right here and now and post bits and pieces as I go along. There are plans for 2015, some of which have already sprouted. Among them the epic Fish Pepper, a favourite from last year. A chile pepper with striped pods and variegated foliage. Great looking plant.

Fish Pepper - Capsicum anuum.

Fish Pepper – Capsicum anuum

One of the reasons I’ve had such a long blog hiatus was me not drawing enough and wanting the next post to be a drawing.  On the other hand, the Fish Pepper is truly as fantastical as anything I could draw at the moment. This article made me buy the seed over a year ago: Fish Peppers – Mother Earth News.

Fish Pepper rainbow

Pods in various stages of maturation

Fish Pepper White BIG

Sometimes the pods go all white

Upcoming: I am buying a Namiki Falcon, finally, from The Goulet Pen Company. Look forward to flex nib drawing in the months to come. Sweet. I am going to try out some black inks and focus on B&W line drawing only for a while, to get going again.

Here is a small drollery of a flower. Image taken with the MacBook and not modified in any way:


This is a drollery I have planned to blog about for a while now. It has hung around in my notebook, just waiting for me to write about it. Everything about this plant-thing, succulent, gravid with something (…something…) …heavy, waiting to burst, is interesting. There is something called Kurbits in Sweden, very popular around the turn of the century at a place in Sweden where I spent my (um, er…) formative years (13-18). I, in true teenage fashion, resolutely deemed the local folk art boring, unsuitable for Yours Truly and Below-My-Artsy-Station, when my (equivalence of) High School offered it as a special course. Sigh. I believe I was quite insufferable. I managed to droll around it later anyway, but as of right now I would have liked to have had attended the course. Of course, Kurbits is not in any way monster-heavy. If you don’t look behind the thin veil of structured, romantic peasantry, that is. The monsters are everywhere, it’s all about where and how you look for them. As we all know, by now.

Below is the image modified in PS, brightness/contrast, playing around with Curves, Sharpening layers, etc. I find it disturbing how much I am able to modify it on the computer. It doesn’t sit quite right with me. Perhaps I just need to get used to it. But I miss black dust and smudges everywhere, I find that a vital part of any drawing endavour.

I might write more about Kurbits in later posts.


PS: “gravid” in Swedish is equivalent to “pregnant/with child”. I find the use of the word “pregnant”, as in e g “a gravid pause” and such” very interesting. The flower above is most decidedly pregnant, the question is with what?

…Sometimes you really have no good excuse for procrastinating, so you should just shut it and get on with it.

Things I have done recently rather than blogging:

1. Researched biopunk. Oh, yes.
2. Continued to plan my collection of botanical SF, Day of the Triffids upcoming. Recommendations of other works welcome by mail or in the comments.
3. Watched plants grow. It is more enjoyable than it sounds. Re: above.
4. London. Once again Kew and Cass art. Bought Bristol board, maybe partly because Ian Miller uses it. I am very curious about it.
5. Failed at keeping in touch with people. An old favourite, unfortunately.
6. Grown Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Swan Lake, a k a Dainty White. This is supposed to be the ‘Fantasia’ cultivar which sometimes have partially/all pink flowers. I will post again if this happens. The plant is from Madeira Exotics, a Portugese shop on British Ebay. I bought it last year. Growing Hibiscus from cuttings is not very difficult, but not for complete beginners either.


I might have drolled around a bit. The title of this blog post is called Back to the classics for a reason, as this is very much nothing new at all and I wish I had something more bombastic to offer. Though there is fish, eyes with feet and what looks like an alien owl involved, which means it cannot be all rubbish.


New view

Not-so-new-but-still-dreamy job still messing with my blogging habit. Newly moved to a great little flat in the center of the small coastal town I think I am going to call my home for a long while. As my various views have been a key part of this blog over the years, I hereby continue this tradition by posting this new view. Enjoy.

newest view

I feel somewhat like a bird living up under the clouds. The flat has windows in three directions: north, east and south. The southern “windows” are actually three very small windows and one big, frigging conservatory/sun room (thank you Wikipedia) that actually is floor-to-ceiling glass to the south, east and west. I am thinking of naming it the Orangery (considering the number of Citrus species I am going to grow there). There will be lots of plant-talk on this blog in the future. You have been warned.

Upcoming: old jewellers glass-topped desk crammed with fountain pens.

The two areas of intrest that have held my attention the longest are exotic (house)plants and fantastic literature. I have been into plants since I was about 12 years old, and at that time I was already an avid reader. A long-standing favourite book that combines these interests, a book I have previously mentioned on this blog, is Hothouse, by Brian Aldiss. His Saliva tree is also a classic in its own right. Of course, there are plenty of others. In my botany-related to-read pile is Phytosphere by Scott Mackay and Mythago Wood by Robert Holdstock. Maybe a future area of collecting, botanical SF and Fantasy? I haven’t even gotten into green/macro biopunk yet. Just wait til I get my lab up and running… Any book recommendations?

I am growing tiny black holes in my bedroom window...

Huernia keniensis. I am growing tiny black holes in my bedroom window…

With an interest in the odd, grotesque and strangely beautiful, the more common houseplants did not do it for me, at least not for long. So I researched… Among the orchids there are many species that look beyond weird but I will start this series with another class of plants, the Stapeliads (tribus stapeliae). To add even more epicness, almost all the generas have names that really trigger the imagination: Huernia, Carraluma, Stapelia, Quaqua and Tromotriche. The genus Hoodia that has been featured in the weight-loss press, is also a stapeliad.

Stapelia grandiflora

Stapelia grandiflora

Probably Stapelia lepida

Probably Stapelia lepida

I wouldn’t go so far as to say reality is more fantastic than mine (and your) imagination. But I would say they are equal, if you know where to look.

These plants are E A S Y to cultivate, cheap to buy cuttings of (but you’ll have to wait a while for them to flower if you buy smaller cuttings) and generally awesome. They do like to dry up between waterings and a sunny, but not burning hot, spot in a bright window. Fortunately, as opposed to several orchid genera, they tend to look nice (Well, barbed-tentacle-nice) even when not flowering. The only disadvantage might be the stink. Yep, most of them are pollinated by flies, not by butterflies or moths. Ergo: “scent” of rotting meat or days-old cadaver. Some species are worse than others. When growing them in a small apartment I either open the window a bit or (really!) cut the flowers off and throw them away after a couple of days.

Upcoming: at least several posts on different orchid species, various pretty-leaf plants and probably more stapeliads, since the ones I bought a couple of years ago now are flowering size. Also, maybe a drollery or to inspired by my plant collection? Moving into my new and plant-wise very optimal apartment next week. Can’t wait!