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Posts Tagged ‘China Miéville’

As I already wrote about in the post For the Love of Monsters, I admire the writings of China Miéville. Perdido Street Station is his second book and the first one I read about 2-3 years ago.

Title: Nightmare Cityscape, New Crobuzon interpretation.
Size: 20×17.5 cm
Equipment: I mainly grabbed what pens I could find as I went along. Lamy 2000, Parker 51, Pentel Brush Pen, sable hair brush, Pentel aquash pens with ink washes. I had to toss one of the aquash pens, as Noodler’s black and the water had become a slimy sludge inside it. Too early for ink to monsterize even before it has left the brush… It was probably contaminated water that destroyed it.
Inks: Rome Burning (yellow-brown), Burma Road Brown (brownish green), Diamine Damson (purple) and black (Noodlers and Pentel brush pen black). Add waterwashes and there you go. The gray is all Noodlers black in washes. I like how the black stays black-gray and does not go toward blue or any other colour when diluted.
Computer alteration: Contrast heightened a bit.
Paper: The paper is too porous to expose to Rome Burning effects, adding water at this point would dissolve it. Clairefontaine 90g sketch paper. Better planning (any planning) and I would have used another paper for this water-heavy experiment. It does take a lot of water for a sketch pad, though. Right now it is my favourite paper.
Inspiration: This drawing grew like something organic sprouted out of the paper. I started out drawing the mouth at the left. As it grew, I came to realise that it was New Crobuzon on the night when the nightmares arrive. The eye-helicopters are my interpretation of potential nightmares. To me a giant eyeball merged with a helicopter seem like nightmare-stuff. Foucault meets Argus meets Stephen King. And where would we be without tentacles? Not on this blog, that is for sure.
Important notice: The inside of my brain probably look a bit like this.
Notes: I did not use the colour changing effects available by washing out Rome Burning in this drawing due to too soft paper. But still, used it in art and I do like the light yellow it becomes when carefully waterwashed without “cleaning off” the yellow pigment. Look at this tentacled man-in-the-moon:

And behind the cut is another detail: (more…)

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This link leads to an interview with author China Miéville in The Believer Magazine.

Funnily, the interview is held (sic) by Lou Anders, who has to be the same Lou Anders who edited the short story collection I recommend in this post. Coincidences, huh? Here is my favourite quote from the interview:

“I love this stuff. And when I write my novels, I’m not writing them to make political points. I’m writing them because I passionately love monsters and the weird and horror stories and strange situations and surrealism, and what I want to do is communicate that. But, because I come at this with a political perspective, the world that I’m creating is embedded with many of the concerns that I have. But I never let them get in the way of the monsters.”

He is gloriously, perfectly right and how could anyone not agree with this?

Probably one of the (many) reasons I like the writings of China Miéville is that he seems fascinated with a lot of things that relate to my own personal obsessions. In Perdido Street Station there is a sprawling, twitching city, birdlike monsters and dreams. In The Scar there is sea monsters, deep sea emptiness and gore. All these things among masses of other monsters, fascinations, surrealistic juxtapositions, strange phenomena and a language that almost drowns the synaesthetic parts of me in floods of colours. It makes me very happy.

Why do I do this?

For the love of monsters.

Details about the drawing: (more…)

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