Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Lamy Safari’

Title: Hopping Horsebirds
Equipment: Lamy Safari B nib with Noodler’s Apache Sunset. Parker 51 EF with Noodler’s Black. Lamy Safari EF with Diamine Poppy Red (for the tongues).
Paper: Rhodia lined notebook
Inspiration: Intuitive drawing with the goal of making these critters really move. I am not sure I am up to psychoanalyzing exactly why I consistently return to motifs of fish, birds, weird animal combinations and juxtaplorations (my very own, very new portmanteau, it gets NO hits at all on Google. Cool. Experimental linguistics certainly lost a talent when I decided to pursue other areas of academia).
Notes: The Lamy Safari B nib is broad and wet to the point that it is possible to use it as a “brush” of sorts, as you can see in the drawing. No brush, no washes, no brush-pen. Just fountain pens! The technique is the same as in the post Drollerish Alien Landscape, only the black colour is here Noodler’s black instead of Parker Black Cartridge. It is interesting how different the colour-palette becomes after changing only one component. It is like the bluish black of the Parker brought forth the orange in the Apache Sunset, while the Noodler’s black mixed with Apache Sunset made all these greenish hues come through. Another good thing with the Noodler’s Black is that it is permanent when dry, so by blending quickly you get a nice mix, but if you want a clear black line you can get that too.
Important notice: The horsebirds are confused because they cannot fly. This is why they are hopping around in vain trying to lift from ground. As they are not very smart, it is unlikely they will stop hopping anytime soon. Quite tragic, really.
In Other News Coming up: the one-year anniversary of the blog. The 22nd of January!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I am slightly synaestethic, associating letters, words and numbers with colours. “Drollery” is a light and airy word, like sunshine on warm sand. The -ish ending makes it even nicer. “Doodle” is not as pretty, it is a more flat beige-boring yellow.

That is why I won’t have a ”doodle”-tag, I’ll call everything that dribbles out of my pen under non-controlled circumstances (when I should be writing) a ”drollery” even though it might not strictly fall in the Wikipedia definition of drollery. A sketch is a whole other story (which I too seldom associate myself with) since it is made under planned, controlled circumstances (at least more controlled than the doodle, right?). The semantics is making my head hurt, so let’s go on to the drawing:

Title: Drollerish Alien Landscape
Size: app. 15×3 cm
Equipment: Parker Rollerball with bluish black cartridge ink, partially dried and clumpy with age (also used making my Swamp Elf). Lamy Safari with broad nib. Coloured ink is Noodler’s Apache Sunset.
Computer alteration: none.
Paper: Rhodia lined notebook.
Inspiration: this calls for an explanation of the word “drollery” (see link above). I first encountered it when I was surfing on Wikipedia looking for variations on intuitive drawing. Believe me, SO much fell in to place. This is my scholarly life, people. Weird conglomerations of animals doing unspeakable things in margins of notebooks. Yep.
Notes: The broad, very smooth nib of the Lamy Safari made blending the two inks easy. Mixed, they produced a very nice yellowish green colour I wish I could reproduce. The Parker pen has kicked the bucket, have not found a suitable replacement yet.
Reading tips I own an interesting book “The Hidden Sense: Synesthesia in Art and Science”. It is edited by Crétien van Campen. The link leads to the publisher, you can also find a very extensive list of publications and other resources there. I look forward to exploring several of them myself.

Read Full Post »

Happy skulls with wings...

Title: Happy Skulls with Wings
Size: Um, 2×10 cm?
Equipment: Brush pen, Noodler’s Black, Lamy Safari. The usual trade.
Computer alteration: No, but bad scan. Sorry.
Paper: Seawhite of Brighton. I am way overdue writing them some fanmail.
Inspiration: I wrote a long, rather mediocre poem about unrest and illustrated it with various little drawings. These guys stayed in my mind much longer than the poem. They remind me of Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck (Knatte, Fnatte och Tjatte in Swedish).
Notes: I very seldom draw skulls. To be honest I am not very fond of skulls as a motif at all. Not sure why.
Links: The use of skulls in art in the way that touches me the most must be in the genre Memento Mori. The first painting from this genre of art that I can remember seeing is Charles Allan Gilberts “All is Vanity”. I believe I saw it in one of my father’s art history books. I’d like to make something in that genre as well, but not with skulls.

Read Full Post »

I have been having a hard time at work lately. Due to various political and local problems, people quitting and such. Not being happy at work and having to spend days solving useless administrative problems instead of doing worthwhile things have made me tired and actually rather depressed. On the other hand, hitting your head against walls does make it more sturdy, ne?

This little drollery, a saucer/sausage, is a little over a year old and made with the lovely combination (if I remember correctly) of Noodler’s Apache Sunset in a Lamy Safari and some black ink (Noodler’s?) in another Lamy Safari (drawin with the tip turned upside down for app 0.5 mm line breadth). The paper is lined Rhodia that is very pleasant to write on, although I prefer my paper blank for obvious reasons.

I think he is flying to a happier place and that he is rather determined to get there. Wish him luck, because I might be going with him!

Read Full Post »

Discovering the joy of writing with different shades of ink, I’m surprised I did not discover fountain pen inks earlier. I love shades, blending, chemistry, drawing. You’d think an interest in inks would come naturally. Alas, after getting my first fountain pens I got a bunch of Diamine inks in small bottles from Nordic Pen Imports. Then I discovered Noodler’s. Now I’ve got more than 50 different inks from various makers (I know that this isn’t much compared to some, but mom, if you read this, I got most of them on sale).

At Fountain Pen Network there is an excellent Index of Ink Reviews section, a great resource. I also have to commend Goulet Pens Ink Drop, where you get several small ink samples in the mail regularly. I’m not a member myself, but I have bought small sample-bottles of ink from there. The Noodler’s Red Black below is from such a bottle.

So, on to the comparison. These are all the reds I have. Written with different pens, this is not a review per se as the ink behave different with different pens. I do not aspire to be a clean cut reviewer, I make up things as I go along. The paper is Clairefountaine Graf It Sketch pad. I plan to post this comparison in the appropriate forum at FPN so if you have come here from that post, welcome to the blog!

Detailed description and more pictures: (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is part of a bigger colourful myriad I am making for a dear friend of mine. Actually for Christmas 2010, so I am a bit late finishing it. Well, it is still not finished.
Do not stress the Artist.

Title: Colourful Myriad
Size: not that big, 10×15 cms maybe.
Equipment: Oh… Here we go. This started out as a way of practising drawing folds, quite unsuccessfully using George Bridgmans Drawing the Draped Figure. I have probably used most of my equipment at some point when drawing this. Pentel Aquash for the watercolour-brush-effect. The red colour is Diamine Poppy Red. The thin black lines is Rotring Art Pen with waterproof ink and/or Lamy Safari EF with Noodler’s Black. I like Noodler’s better. The Purple is most likely Diamine Royal Purple, a colour I do not like for some reason. The brown is Diamine Chocolate Brown, mixed with Parker rollerball black ink (goes bluish in wash). The green in the eyes (can you see that the eyes are on someones’ back?) is the wonderful Rohrer & Klingner Alt Goldgrün, one of my absolute favourite inks of all time.
Computer alteration: Changed brightness and contrast slightly.
Paper: Seawhite of Brighton (and soon, in May, we go to London again and I will break the bank buying more of this awesome paper!).
Notes: The anatomy is a bit off, I know. Comes from drawing this freehand on a boat. At least that’s my excuse.
Other parts of this drawing is definitely at least PG-13 rated. That is, half-nude females, nipples and such. I did a large part of the drawing on a ferry-trip. I usually get quite immersed in my own private little world when drawing, so I got rather startled when I discovered that I had become surrounded by a group of curious 11-yearolds. They were on a school-trip and very interested in how I could draw something like this. I held an impromptu drawing-lesson (practise daily, have fun), all the while hoping no guardian would come by and take offense at all the (well, three) nipples. The kids didn’t seem to mind. They seldom do. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Title: Little Green Girl Monster
Size: 7 x 5 cm
Equipment: Lamy Safari demonstrator with Noodler’s Gruene Cactus, water and a synthetic brush.
Computer alteration: I actually darkened this one a bit. Paradoxically, it brought out the lighter areas in the image.
Paper: About a year ago I started drawing in a very small no-brand sketchbook from London (7×7 cm) that quickly got the name “the Little Book of Monsters” (who is surprised?). Every page (about 10 done by now) is a small picture of a monster. This was one of the first ones.
In the detail photo after the cut, you can quite clearly see feathering, which I used in this image as an effect. Feathering is (apart from being a beautiful word) when the porousness and fiber properties of the paper makes the ink diffuse and spread in all directions. If it spreads through to the other side of the paper it is called bleedthrough. Usually, especially when writing, feathering is a bad thing and often associated with bad quality paper (at least for writing purposes). For a close-up picture, see below. (more…)

Read Full Post »